Rebecca Claire

I was in love with everything -
I wanted to look with love at the angry people
so that their eyes would be forced to respond;
and I wanted to bring gifts to the envious and tell them
that I am worthless.

- Egon Schiele, Die Aktion, 1914
erikkwakkel:

Gifs before gifs
We all love gifs - those highly entertaining movable feasts that are so popular on Tumblr. Here is one, but it has a history that predates the internet. You are looking at a gif of a phenakistiscope, a 19th-century revolving paper disk imprinted with a series of drawings, which was spun so as to produce a moving image. The device was invented around 1840 by Joseph Plateau. Dancing couples, jumping monkeys, acrobats, and figures jumping into the mouths of lions: Plateau’s stroboscopic disks produced highly entertaining mini-movies, like our modern gifs, be it over a century and a half before animation films were first made. When we look at a gif on Tumblr, let’s remember that the technique of producing such moving images made up from a small batch of individual pictures dates back to a pre-digital world - to the days before movies, photography and digital cameras.
Gif: this is the source of the 21st-century gif of a 19th-century phenakistiscope presented above. Check out some (real moving) examples here, here, here and here.

erikkwakkel:

Gifs before gifs

We all love gifs - those highly entertaining movable feasts that are so popular on Tumblr. Here is one, but it has a history that predates the internet. You are looking at a gif of a phenakistiscope, a 19th-century revolving paper disk imprinted with a series of drawings, which was spun so as to produce a moving image. The device was invented around 1840 by Joseph Plateau. Dancing couples, jumping monkeys, acrobats, and figures jumping into the mouths of lions: Plateau’s stroboscopic disks produced highly entertaining mini-movies, like our modern gifs, be it over a century and a half before animation films were first made. When we look at a gif on Tumblr, let’s remember that the technique of producing such moving images made up from a small batch of individual pictures dates back to a pre-digital world - to the days before movies, photography and digital cameras.

Gif: this is the source of the 21st-century gif of a 19th-century phenakistiscope presented above. Check out some (real moving) examples here, here, here and here.

(via vintagegal)

sthomasomas:

Dioptase is an intense emerald-green to bluish-green copper cyclosilicate mineral. It is transparent to translucent. Its luster is vitreous to sub-adamantine. Its formula is CuSiO3·H2O (also reported as CuSiO2(OH)2). It has a hardness of 5, the same as tooth enamel. Its specific gravity is 3.28–3.35, and it has two perfect and one very good cleavage directions. Additionally, dioptase is very fragile and specimens must be handled with great care. It is a trigonal mineral, forming 6-sided crystals that are terminated by rhombohedra.

Photo (HD fyi) and text courtesy of Wikipedia commons and Pinterest user Bell the Cat

(via murderotic)

likeafieldmouse:

Miroslav Tichy

Tichy was an eccentric. He was held prisoner for almost a decade in Soviet labor camps just for that—being an eccentric, falsely accused of dissidence.

Upon his release in the early 70s, he wandered his small town in rags pursuing his voyeuristic obsession with the female form by photographing women unawares in the streets, shops and parks, through windows and fences, with cameras he fashioned out of tin cans, children’s eyeglass lenses and other junk he picked up while wandering. 

Part of my art A level was based on this guy! What an odd ball legend!

(Source: likeafieldmouse, via nicolaporter)

A pug I drew for Caitlin’s card. 

A pug I drew for Caitlin’s card. 

Borp borp borp. I still haven’t started drawing. Procrastinaynaynaynaytion.

Back to the drawing board.

After over 4 months away from illustration and graphics it’s about time I whipped my ass (pencil) back into shape!

I literally haven’t done any considered/fruitful creative activities since the day of hand in on the 16th May and it’s safe to say my brain has turned into somewhat of a blamange.

So, I’m going to bite the bullet and hopefully get back into illustration again. Now if I can just stop procrastinating by blogging about the fact I’m going to do some drawing and just do it then that’d be great…

Just before I get on with it I’ll let you know what I’m going to do.

One of my 6 projects for my final year of uni was The Book Illustration competition from the House of Illustration. I had to create 3 illustrations and a cover for Angela Carter’s The Bloody Chamber. This year it’s Aldous Huxley’s A Brave New World. So, I’m going to do it again because the story sounds awesome and it’s a format that I’m familiar with to ease myself back in.

Today I’m going to read the first two-ish pages (maybs the first chapter) and then get stuck into some drawing based on that.

Now I just need to find where I left the book and away we goooo…